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Claire Dunning is an assistant professor at the School of Public Policy at the University of Maryland, College Park, where she is an affiliated faculty member in the Do Good Institute and the History Department. 
 
Dunning is a political and urban historian of the United States in the 20th century, focusing on the history of poverty, inequality, governance, and nonprofit  organizations in American cities. Her work has been published in the Journal of Urban History and Enterprise & Society. She is currently writing a book on the history of public-private partnerships in cities from the 1950s to present. The book analyzes efforts by policymakers, philanthropists, grassroots activists, and nonprofit executives to reduce poverty in American cities, and considers the local consequences of pursuing a public good through private organizations. Dunning holds a PhD in history from Harvard University and an AB in history and public policy from Dartmouth College. She was a Postdoctoral Fellow at Stanford University’s Center on Philanthropy and Civil Society, and previously worked at a community foundation.

Areas of Interest
  • U.S. history, nonprofit organizations & philanthropy, social policy, urban policy, democracy
3 Credit(s)

Through discussions of contemporary trends, challenges and issues, this course provides an introduction to the nonprofit and NGO sectors, social innovation, and the leadership and management skills required to achieve social impact. The course will explore the history, theories, and roles of philanthropy, the nonprofit sector, and social innovation in societies and cultures. Students will be able to demonstrate an understanding of the process and principles of social entrepreneurship and social innovation. Additionally, the course will introduce students to topics in leadership, social innovation, resource development, community mobilization through networks, the role of policy-making in creating change, project management, and overall strategies for achieving social impact. The course will include mini hands-on learning experiences that allow them to apply key learning outcomes.
Schedule of Classes

3 Credit(s)

An integrative course that allows policy students to explore the complexities of the policy-making process from the perspective of specific policy topics. They will learn about and discuss subject- based issues in a seminar format led by faculty and policy experts. Site visits to federal agencies, guest speakers, and round table sessions ensure that students receive a variety of real-world perspectives on their chosen policy area. Restricted to students who have earned a minimum of 90 credits.
Schedule of Classes

3 Credit(s)

Explores different schools of thought related to strategic philanthropy: defined as privately funded ventures designed to achieve social outcomes, spur innovation, and/or shape public policy. We examine the development of and challenges related to strategic philanthropy, its relationships to the government and business sectors as well as the successful skills and approaches of leaders and organizations engaged in strategic philanthropy. Other course topics include designing competitions from traditional request for proposals grant making to prize competitions, portfolio and risk management, grantee engagement, and grantee and program evaluation. We will also examine efforts to translate various philanthropic approaches to the public sector, governmental grant making, and traditional and emerging partnerships and collaborations between strategic philanthropy and government. 
Schedule of Classes

Prerequisite(s): PLCY798Y encouraged

Faculty: Claire Dunning